Wine buyers get revolutionary education

Wine buyers get revolutionary education News Wine News
  • Thursday 12 April 2001

Consumers are about to find out exactly how a bottle of French wine is made – and all they have to do is read the label on the bottle.

French Revolution (pictured), released in several UK stores this month (June 2000), represents a back-to-basics winemaking philosophy – something which winemaker Paul Boutinot believes customers need nowadays as assurance when buying a bottle.

Boutinot has been advocating traditional winemaking methods for over 20 years. At a time when modern-day practices are in danger of disturbing the natural balance of wine, he has introduced a red and a white with labels that tell the buyer exactly how the classic wine is made.

Spokeswoman Deborah Brooks explains, 'These simply-made wines aim to revolutionise the French wine market. People are being brought up with fruity wines from the new world, but it is regrettable that in some instances science has overtaken tradition with no real benefit to the customer.' She adds, 'With this labelling, we hope to make them more aware of our philosophy.'

The wine is being sold in major UK retailers Tesco, Sainsbury's, Safeway and First Quench, and it is priced at £4.99 (US$8.00). A Sainsbury's spokesperson says, 'We are selling the wine because of its extremely good value and its eye-catching packaging.'

The red (60% Grenache, 40% Syrah) and white (65% Chenin-Blanc, 35% Sauvignon Blanc) are both made from hand-picked grapes grown in the Rhone Valley and on the river Loire. Wine shops are holding 1500 in-store tastings of French Revolution (15-16 July 2000) across the country (to coincide with the anniversary of the storming of the Bastille).

For Father's Day in the UK (18 June 2000), Boutinot has released another French wine, simply called Old Git. Again, the wine is a 'traditional and natural' fruity red and 'phenomenal sales' have already been reported from the company.

The label claims, 'There is really no substitute for tradition and experience, just ask any Old Git.'

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