Shoppers the world over have embraced organic produce, but for wine the adoption process seems to be advancing at a slower pace. Jane Anson comes to the rescue with 30 great buys, all under £30...

The idea of buying locally, cooking with seasonal ingredients and supporting responsible farming has become so embedded in food culture as to barely raise an eyebrow
these days.


This article appears in Decanter magazine’s December 2017 issue and is currently only available online to Decanter Premium members


And yet there is still far less acceptance of this with wine, even though – as with food – plenty of bottles are produced for a mass audience, with shortcuts taken along the way to ensure they taste good without costing a fortune to make.I wanted to write a book to celebrate the winemakers who rally against this.

To highlight those who treat their workers fairly, who reduce or eliminate their carbon emissions, who plant hedgerows and encourage biodiversity, who use grapes that are indigenous to their regions rather than importing the big-name international varieties, who use as little as possible in terms of additions.


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New Zealand organic

What is biodynamic wine?

Biodynamic wines are produced in accordance with biodynamic principles that emphasise holistic agricultural methods and minimal intervention post-harvest.