Thierry Roset, the chef de caves at Charles Heidsieck Champagne house, has died at the age of 55.

Roset’s death was first reported by local newspaper L’Union and has since sparked tributes from wine critics and producers. He is reported to have died suddenly on Sunday October, 5.

He had only been chef de caves at Charles Heidsieck since 2012, following the departure of Régis Camus, but had recently celebrated 25 years with the Champagne house. In 1985 Roset spent time as a trainee with the then chef de caves Daniel Thibault in which time he participated in the blending of the acclaimed Blanc des Millénaires 1985 and of the iconic the Champagne Charlie 1985.

He finally joined as assistant to Thibault in 1988 and joined Régis Camus’ winemaking team, on a full-time basis, in 2003. Previously he had also worked for both Moet & Chandon and Louis Roederer, making him a veteran of the Champagne world.

‘I am deeply saddened by the unexpected news,’ said Champagne expert Essi Avellan MW. ‘We have lost such an amiable, humble and exceptionally talented man, who had still so much to give. Fortunately he has left a formidable legacy in the champagnes he crafted.’

Speaking about Roset’s passing, Decanter Tastings Director Christelle Guibert said ‘Champagne has lost a true star’.

‘Thierry Roset was a very talented man, yet so modest about his achievement at Charles Heidsieck. He always praised his winemaking team when complimenting the quality of the range. Today, Charles Heidsieck is one of the most consistent and best value Champagnes on the market and Thierry played a fundamental part in building the brand to the level it is today’.

During his short time as chef de caves, Roset helped to oversee Charles Heidsieck’s transition from Remy Cointreau to new owner Societe Europeenne de Participations Industrielles (EPI). Remy sold both Charles and Piper Heidsieck to EPI in 2011.

Written by Chris Mercer