The following is a summary of state direct shipping laws. These changes apply only when an out-of-state customer is present in person at the winery at the time of purchase:

States that will change because of the new law:

CONNECTICUT – allows for up to 4 gallons

DELAWARE – allows up to 1 liter (federal limit)

FLORIDA – allows up to 1 gallon

INDIANA – allows up to 1 quart

MAINE – allows up to 1 gallon

MASSACHUSETTS – allows up to 3 gallons

MICHIGAN – allows up to 312 oz.

MONTANA – allows up to 3 gallons on your person (this would be different from amounts allowed to a consumer who has a connoisseur’s permit)

NEW JERSEY – allows up to 1 gallon

NORTH CAROLINA – up to 50 liters

OKLAHOMA – allows up to 1 liter

SOUTH CAROLINA – allows up to 1 gallon

SOUTH DAKOTA – allows up to 1 gallon

TENNESSEE – allows up to 1 gallon

TEXAS – allows up to 3 gallons

VERMONT – allows up to 6 gallons

VIRGINIA – allows up to 1 gallon

States that already allow direct shipments under reciprocal or limited direct shipment laws (these states will not be changed):

Arizona – (current law allows one case – consumer, not winery, must make shipment)

Alaska (limited direct state – already allows for “a reasonable amount”)

California (reciprocal state)

Colorado (reciprocal state)

District of Columbia (no change – already allows up to 1 gallon)

Georgia (limited direct state – 5 cases when on site)

Hawaii (reciprocal state)

Idaho (reciprocal state)

Iowa (reciprocal state)

Illinois (reciprocal state)

Louisiana (limited direct state – permit required)

Minnesota (reciprocal state)

Missouri (reciprocal state)

Nebraska (limited direct state – permit required)

New Hampshire (limited direct state – permit required)

New Mexico (reciprocal state)

Nevada (limited direct state – permit required)

Oregon (reciprocal state)

Rhode Island (limited direct from on-premise already allowed)

Washington (reciprocal state)

Wisconsin (reciprocal state)

West Virginia (reciprocal state)

Wyoming (limited direct state – permit required

States that will continue to prohibit direct shipments:

Alabama (no change – requires advance approval from ABC board)

Arkansas (no change – requires advance payment of excise taxes)

Kansas (no change – only allows carry-on from outside of US)

Kentucky (keeps onsite sale provision of old law, but no shippers carry due to felony in dry areas of the state.)

Maryland (no change – delivery of alcohol to private individuals via common carrier is specifically prohibited by other statutes.)

Mississippi (no change – all personal transport prohibited)

Pennsylvania (no change – only permits when returning from outside of U.S.)

North Dakota (no change – only allows for special circumstances where taxes are prepaid)

New York (no change – all personal transport prohibited)

Ohio (no change – requires pre-approval by ABC and payment of taxes in advance and only for those wines not already available in Ohio.)

Utah (no change – only permits when returning from outside of U.S.)

Written by Decanter staff