The best places to stay, eat and drink along coastal Croatia....

Dalmatia: Restaurants, hotels and shops

How to get there

Fly direct to Split or Dubrovnik from most major European cities. Or take a cross-Adriatic ferry from Italy (Ancona or Bari), arriving in Split or Vis town. Or the highway from Zagreb to Split is stunning, if you have the time to drive.


Dalmatia: Accomodation

Agritourism Frano Milina Bire, Lumbarda, Korčula

Avoid the sightly tacky tourist feel of Korčula town, and stay in this attractive small winery in Lumbarda. Not only is it convenient for beautiful beaches, Bire makes one of the top wines from local rarity Grk. www.bire.hr/en/lumbarda-4

Prijeko Palace, Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik is a pricey place to stay, but if you’re going to do it, then you should splash out at this boutique hotel within the gorgeous UNESCO listed walled town. www.prijekopalace.com

Dalmatia

Prijeko Palace, Dubrovnik

St Luke Residence, Split

Immaculately decorated rooms in a central but peaceful location convenient for the palace and the port, and a super-friendly host. Excellent views from the balcony too. www.stlukeresidence.com

Vinarija Bartulovic, Pelješac

Stay in the heart of the peninsula’s winelands at this family winery, with comfortable, well-priced rooms and a traditional restaurant. www.vinarijabartulovic.hr


Plan a wine tour from Split to Dubrovnik


Dalmatia: Restaurants

Kantun, Vis

A short walk from Vis town’s harbour, this peacefully situated restaurant with tables in a sheltered garden and on the quayside is one of Vis’ best. There’s an extensive list of Dalmatian wines, friendly service and outstanding cuisine. Book ahead. +385 21 711 306

Konoba Kopačina, Donji Humac, Brač

Brač is famous for its lamb, and this is the place to eat it. Huge kebabs are roasted over hot coals, or you can choose a Peka (meat or vegetables slow cooked on the embers). Wonderful views over the island’s interior and rooms also available. +385 21 647 707

Dalmatia, Ma Toni

Ma Toni. Credit: www.ma-toni.com

Ma Toni, Split

A short walk from Diocletian’s palace, this cosy cellar restaurant serves outstanding traditional food – expect homemade pasta, seasonal delicacies and fresh seafood. There are gems on the wine list, but order by the bottle – the house wines are disappointing. Wines can also be bought in the small on-site shop. www.ma-toni.com

Paradajz Lost, Vis

Behind the Turkish watchtower is a bohemian courtyard bar, which is possibly Vis town’s coolest place to drink. You can breakfast here or drink a coffee during the day, but the atmosphere is much more lively at night. The selection of local wines can be hit or miss, but the ambience and setting are the main attraction. +385 91 855 6678

Uje Oil & Wine, Split

In the middle of Diocletian’s palace is this smart, inviting restaurant, which offers olive oil tastings (daily at 11am) and a great wine list. The cuisine is simple but elegant. Its sister location is just across the street, a small, no-frills wine bar where you can enjoy another glass after dinner. www.eng.oilbar.hr

Dalmatia: Wine shops

Telemax Novi Fumar 2, Split

This tobacconist/newsagent looks unassuming enough, until you notice the wine section. There’s a huge selection of Croatian wines from all the islands and major mainland regions. Prices are very reasonable. Kralja Tomislava 1


Simon Woolf is an award-winning writer, columnist and specialist in natural wines. Edited for Decanter.com by Ellie Douglas.

This originally appeared as part of a travel feature in Decanter magazine: Subscribe to Decanter here. 


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