An imperial of Chateau Lafleur 2000 has fetched just under £30,000 at Christie’s – in a sale in which takings exceeded upper estimates by 21%.

Pomerol’s relatively unsung Château Lafleur, with its significant proportion of cabernet franc, is often in the shadow of its neighbour Chateau Petrus. But is has many champions, not least wine merchant John Armit, who praises Lafleur for its ‘great ageing potential, remarkable quality and its true reflection of the exceptional terroir in Pomerol’.

On November 15, it was Lafleur’s day in the sun as 74 lots of wine from this exceptional Pomerol property, 40 sourced directly from the château, went under the hammer at Christie’s sale of Fine and Rare Wines in London. Given such impeccable provenance, it was no surprise that takings exceeded the upper estimates by 21 per cent, with large formats including imperials and double magnums in huge demand.

The top lot was an imperial (6 litres) of 2000 Lafleur, which was sold for £29,250 (the upper estimate was £16,000), while 12 bottles of the 1982 vintage fetched £19,125 and six magnums from 2000 vintage achieved £18,000.

The 1998 vintage, much vaunted on the Right Bank, was also in strong demand, with £7,312.50 paid for an imperial, £5,625 for six magnums and £3,600 for a case of 12 bottles.

Covering just 4.5ha in one holding on the plateau in Pomerol, adjacent to Pétrus, Le Gay and Vieux Château Certan, Lafleur is owned by Jacques and Sylvie Guinaudeau who run the property with their son Baptiste.

In 1984 they created a second label, Pensées de Lafleur. This ‘jewel’ and ‘insider’s secret’, in the words of Christie’s’ Anthony Hanson, produces on average less than 1000 cases of wine every year.

Written by Anthony rose