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Cattier joins Majestic’s Champagne portfolio 

Cattier joins Majestic's Champagne portfolio as part of a move by the retailer to bring in more premium names ahead of expected festive shortages on some of its grand marques lines.

Majestic has added Champagne Cattier, one of France’s oldest family-owned wineries, to its sparkling portfolio as part of a move by the retailer to bring in more premium names ahead of expected festive shortages on some of its grand marques lines.  

The new listing comprises the house’s Premier Cru Rosé and Brut, plus premium Blanc de Blanc and Vintage releases, including the critically acclaimed Clos du Moulin.

Marking the first national listing for Champagne Cattier in the UK, the wines are available from Majestic’s 200+ stores now.

The Cattier launch is one of a number being lined up by Majestic ahead of the crucial winter period, with the retailer stating that having a key range of ‘exciting, premium Champagnes’ had become a real focus.

‘We’re delighted to be bringing these exclusive Cattier lines to Majestic, and believe they are an exceptional addition to our range,’ said chief commercial officer Rob Cooke. ‘Champagne lovers can look forward to trying something truly unique, with a product rooted in the history of the region, that really showcases why it’s worth spending a little more.’

Originally founded in 1618, Cattier is renowned as the producer of Champagne Armand de Brignac — the label behind ‘Ace of Spades’.

While the bottles under this label have tended to grab the spotlight, Cattier has continued to produce quality focused champagnes under the guidance of a 12th generation grower – Jean Jacques Cattier and son Alexandre Cattier.

Overall, Champagne could see its smallest crop for 40 years, according to France’s agriculture ministry, but this month’s harvest also revealed the disparity in producers’ fortunes in a year hit by frost, mildew and hail, as reported by Decanter earlier this month.

Final figures are not yet available, with picking having only finished this week, but it’s clear that Champagne has faced one of its most difficult growing seasons for many years.

This follows three successive warm and sunny vintages that were pretty easy to manage and practically free of vineyard diseases.


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