So you need to find enough wine to satisfy guests ranging from troublesome Aunt Lynne, who only drinks rosé, to your university and college friends, plus that distant uncle who knows his Beaujolais from his claret. And you also need to save money for a honeymoon, ideally in a beautiful wine region. Buying wedding wine is certainly a challenge.

Here's 10 wines that we recommend looking at, as well as our tips on how to increase your chances of a good deal.

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So you have a wedding coming up but don’t know where to start when it comes to picking your wedding wines?

Read on for recommendations, plus some useful tips that could save you time and money.


Scroll down for Decanter’s tips on buying wedding wine


Recommended wedding wines:

Sainsbury's, Taste the Difference English Sparkling Brut,

Sainsbury's, Taste the Difference English Sparkling Brut,

Produced by Denbies for Sainsbury's, this has a bready nose with lovely clean, fresh lemon and dough flavours in the mouth. There is a chalky acidity, not as tart as some, and the wine is well balanced with a stone fruit and honeycomb richness coming through on the finish.

Points 91
De Telmont, Grande Réserve, Champagne, France

De Telmont, Grande Réserve, Champagne, France

A delighful Champagne, made by a family-owned Champagne house. A Chardonnay/Pinot Noir/Pinot Meunier blend, presenting complex richness and elegance with lifted toasty, yeasty, brioche notes and apple and honey-touched flavours. Creamy, delightful fine mousse and bright acidity.

Points 89
Mionetto, Prosecco, Prestige Collection Treviso Brut, Veneto

Mionetto, Prosecco, Prestige Collection Treviso Brut, Veneto

Mionetto are one of the leading Prosecco producers and certainly one of the oldest, dating back to 1887. This is fresh and light with aromas of white peach, ripe Charentais melon and a touch of elderflower. The palate is crisp and refreshing with some sweetness, as you expect, but it…

Points 89
Tesco, Blanquette de Limoux, Finest* 1531, 2014

Tesco, Blanquette de Limoux, Finest* 1531, 2014

Named due to the widely held belief that the first sparkling wine was produced in Limoux in 1531, at the abbey of St-Hilaire. Made from local variety Mauzac, blended with smaller quantities of both Chardonnay and Chenin Blanc, with some of the Chardonnay fermented in French oak barrels to add…

Points 88
Alfredo Arribas, 4 Gotes, Priorat, Mainland Spain, 2015

Alfredo Arribas, 4 Gotes, Priorat, Mainland Spain, 2015

Clean and fresh on the nose, but relatively unfocussed, though there is a sense of earthy, liquorice refinement. More in the offing than in the glass right now, however the palate is bright, acidic, stony and spicy; a tumbling mountain stream of purity and freshness, which is pretty good going…

Points 93
Porta 6, Lisboa, Portugal, 2015

Porta 6, Lisboa, Portugal, 2015

From the indigenous varieties of Touriga Nacional, Tinta Roriz and Castelão, this is a straightforward, medium-bodied red with blackcurrant and floral notes. It is very refreshing and vibrant with smooth tannins and, more importantly, it is worth every penny.

Points 90
Zensa, Nero d'Avola, Puglia, Italy, 2015

Zensa, Nero d'Avola, Puglia, Italy, 2015

The name ‘Zensa’ is the Italian phonation of the word ‘senza’ meaning ‘without’, relating to the fact that no chemical pesticides or fertilisers were used in the making of this charming red. It’s vibrant and full of life, with a red cherry and spice character. The palate is quite juicy,…

Points 90
Ca'Mandato, Pinot Grigio, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy, 2016

Ca'Mandato, Pinot Grigio, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy, 2016

If you ever need proof that you get what you pay for, this is it. For less than £2 more than Asda's Extra Special Pinot Grigio, you get a beautifully soft example showing flavours of bruised apple, pear, melon and citrus. It's round and vibrant and definitely worth the extra…

Points 90
Aldi, Freeman's Bay Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, 2016

Aldi, Freeman's Bay Sauvignon Blanc, Marlborough, 2016

Typical Sauvignon aromas full of ripe green apple, lime and goosberry. The palate is very much faithful to these fruit characteristics, full of beautifully balanced sweetness from the fruit and a dry, crisp acidity. Perfect summertime drinking.

Points 89
Cavalchina, Bardolino, Chiaretto, Veneto, Italy, 2016

Cavalchina, Bardolino, Chiaretto, Veneto, Italy, 2016

Founded in the early 1900s, Cavalchina is an important producer in the area of Custoza. In the 1960s they made the pioneering decision to stop selling their white as 'Soave' and instead promote it as 'Bianco di Custoza'. This rosé is made from a similar blend to what you might…

Points 89
Sacha Lichine, Single Blend Rosé, France, 2016

Sacha Lichine, Single Blend Rosé, France, 2016

A simple and refreshing Grenache-based rosé made by Sacha Lichine, who also produces Whispering Angel at Château d'Esclans. Fresh pears with summery strawberry and raspberry aromas are combined with mineral notes on both nose and palate, leaving a pleasing strawberry finish. With a retail price of around £11, this is…

Points 87

 


How to buy wine for your wedding

While many people attempt to match the wine to the food for their special day, our advice would be to keep it simple.

Choose a red and a white (or rosé) for the table that will please the majority of guests

People will be far too distracted by the glamour and buzz of the occasion to consider whether a Rioja would have been a better match with the lamb, unless your guests include almost exclusively Masters of Wine and Master Sommeliers, of course.

In general, remember that acidity is your friend if trying to match a wine to a variety of foods.

Prosecco, Cava and Crémant make great alternatives to Champagne

Prosecco is a great choice for the summer, because it is light and fresh.

Traditional method styles (i.e made in the same way as Champagne) include Cava, Franciacorta, and many Crémants and English sparkling wines. They tend to have more richness and complexity of flavour than Prosecco; more akin to Champagne itself.

One bottle per adult is a good rule of thumb

Don’t be tempted to increase the quantity too much further – by the time you have factored in beer, spirits & cocktails, designated drivers and tee-totallers then you will find an average of a bottle of wine (about five glasses) each is about right.

That said, a couple of reserves wouldn’t hurt. Unless you have the ability to replicate the ‘first miracle’ – ie, turning water into wine – it would be poor form to run dry.

Experience counts

Independents and high street chains have vast amounts of experience when it comes to helping people choose their wedding wine. Most will also offer free delivery to the venue and help out if you have any last minute hiccups.

Supermarkets can be great if you know what you want, but the personal service of a good wine merchant can pay dividends.

Make use of sale or return policies

A common mistake is to panic and over-order. Luckily, many wine merchants and some supermarkets offer a sale or return policy, meaning that you can return anything that has not been drunk.

But it is far better to get your quantities accurate and take the odd leftover case or two back to your house, rather than dragging a van load of alcohol back to where you bought it from.

Don’t forget to haggle – especially at the end of the month

Buying in quantity may give you some serious bargaining power. Many wine merchants will be happy to strike a deal with you, especially if you walk in at the end of the month – you may be the difference between hitting their targets or not. Beware though, this rarely works in supermarkets.

Use a wedding calculator

Many merchants and supermarkets have calculators that will help you determine how much wine you will need, although they work with varying degrees of accuracy. Here are a couple of reliable examples:


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