Second thoughts: Bordeaux second wines

While no one would criticise the Bordelais’ continuing quest for quality, is the increasing trend towards second – and now third – wines good for consumers? Jane Anson reports

More or less: different policies

Ch Lafite-Rothschild, Pauillac 1CC: 117ha, 50%-60% second wine (Carruades de Lafite).

Ch Latour, Pauillac 1CC:
85ha, 47ha in L’Enclos. Previously used entirely for first wine, now selected into second wine, Les Forts de Latour, and third wine, Le Pauillac de Château Latour.

Ch Margaux, Margaux 1CC:
80ha (of red grapes), 33% used to make first wine; 33% second wine, Pavillon Rouge; 33% used for third wine, Margaux de Château Margaux, and a fourth wine which is sold in bulk and made to improve the quality of the bottled wines. Twenty years ago, the grand vin represented about two-thirds of the crop.

Ch Mouton-Rothschild, Pauillac 1CC: 84ha, 40-50% second wine (Le Petit Mouton)

Ch Brane-Cantenac, Margaux 2CC:
75ha of vines, 60% second wine (Le Baron de Brane).

Ch Cos d’Estournel, St-Estèphe 2CC: 91ha, 25% second wine (Les Pagodes de Cos).

Ch Léoville-Barton, St-Julien 2CC: 48ha, 20% second wine (La Réserve de Léoville- Barton), now heading closer to 30% for the second wine.

Ch Montrose, St-Estèphe 2CC: 95ha, 40% second wine (La Dame de Montrose). Started third wine from the 2010 vintage, 15% third wine.

Ch Marquis de Terme, Margaux 4CC:
40ha, 30% second wine (La Couronne de Marquis de Terme); produced 15% second wine a decade ago.

Ch St-Pierre, St-Julien 4CC: 17ha, no second wine.

Ch Batailley, Pauillac 5CC: 57ha, no second wine.

Ch Pontet Canet, Pauillac 5CC: 90ha of vines, 10% goes into the second wine (Les Hauts de Pontet-Canet).

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