Heart disease: beneficial

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November 19, 2009

Source: The Daily Telegraph http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/6597011/Drinking-up-to-bottle-of-wine-a-day-can-cut-heart-disease-risk.html

Drinking up to a bottle a wine a day can cut the risk of heart disease, says a controversial new study. The research, published in the journal Heart, found that the risk of coronary heart disease, or CHD, decreases as alcohol consumption increases. Dr Larraitz Arriola, author of the study, found that drinking up to 11 units – or a bottle of red wine – reduced the risk of developing heart disease by 50%.

December 5, 2008

Source: Daily Mail

Can red wine mimic the health effect of oily fish? A glass or two of wine a day helps the body make oils that are good for the heart, research suggests.

A study of hundreds of couples revealed that drinking small amounts of alcohol boosts levels of omega 3. The oils, which are more usually associated with eating oily fish, are credited with a host of health benefits, from cutting the risk of heart disease to boosting brain power. Most effective of all is red wine, with one small glass a day for women and two for men providing optimum benefit, the Italian study found.

June 4, 2008

Source: Daily Express http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/46878/How-a-glass-of-red-a-day-keeps-you-young-at-heart

A daily glass of red wine may counterbalance rich foods and be the key to keeping your heart young.

A team in America has discovered that a compound found in red wine appears to protect the heart from ageing and may do almost as much good as eating a low-calorie diet.

The latest research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was done only on mice. But the team believe the findings would be equivalent to a middle-aged man drinking a glass of red wine a day.

May 6, 2008

Source: Daily Mail

Research by Italian and American researchers found that consumption of white wine protects against heart attacks. Their study featured three wines: two Tocais and a Verduzzo from the Friuli-Venezia region of Italy.

April 4, 2006

Source: Daily Mail http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-381955/Could-wine-really-good-heart.html

People who drink 14 or more glasses of wine or beer a week have the lowest risk of a heart attack, according to new research.

A ten-year study of 4,400 men and women aged 65 and over found a link between the amount of alcohol drunk and the likelihood of heart disease.

Those who had between one and six drinks a week were seven per cent less likely to have a problem than long-term abstainers. For those who had seven to 13 drinks a week, the risk dropped by 20 per cent, and for those having 14 or more drinks, the risk was reduced by about 40 per cent.

“In these people, consumption of 14 or more drinks a week was associated with the lowest risk of coronary heart disease,” say the researchers from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in Boston.

July 3, 2003

Source: Daily Mail

Nurses are giving heart patients at the Great Western Hospital in Swindon two glasses [of red wine] a day. Research has shown that a regular, moderate amount of red wine can cut the chances of having a heart attack by 50% and a stroke by 20%.

September 2, 2002

Source: Journal of the American Heart Association

Middle-aged men who drink two glasses of red wine a day after suffering a heart attack reduce their risk of another heart attack by more than 50%, a study has found.

Research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association followed 353 men, aged 40–60, who had already had a heart attack. Some drank wine in varying quantities and some abstained.

March 28, 2002

Source: Daily Mail

People who drink up to 30 units of alcohol a week are less likely to die of a heart attack than abstainers. Moderate drinking – two glasses of wine for men and one for women – may improve the chances of surviving a heart attack.

May 10, 2001

Source: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Drinking alcohol can reduce the risk of heart disease – but only if you’re over 55. Researchers at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine have worked out that alcohol is responsible for far fewer deaths than previously published figures suggest, but only amongst men over 55 and women over 65.

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