William Kelley delves into the re-making of rosé wine in the US, looking at how styles have changed from the blush of yesteryear and picking out several wines worth drinking.


  • Scroll down to see William Kelley’s top California rosé wines


By now, it’s a familiar story: rosé wine is thriving in the United States. The cloyingly sweet blush wines of yesteryear may have lost market share, but sales of dry rosé have soared to unprecedented heights, enjoying double-digit growth and capturing the imaginations of millennial consumers.

What’s more, the dollar value of rosé sales have grown faster even than sales themselves. In fact, the rosé boom is biggest in the $15-$25 niche, whereas off-dry white Zinfandels still routinely retail for less than $5 per bottle.

Trends like this don’t go unnoticed, and there’s no shortage of new passengers on the rosé bandwagon. Celebrities have gotten on board, most famously Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie with their Château Miraval in Provence.

So have powerful players in California: last year, Deutsch Family Wine & Spirits, which distributes Australian brand [yellow tail], debuted a rosé under their Josh Cellars label; and in March, wine titan Meiomi, recently acquired by Constellation Brands, launched its inaugural offering in the category, a Pinot Noir dominant blend.

Insatiable demand

Insatiable demand is driving supply. ‘We saw rosés from Provence hit the market earlier than ever before this year’, observes Larry Schaffer, who produces a superb Mourvèdre rosé in Santa Barbara under his Tercero label.

‘Even Bandol rosés, usually not slated for release until later in the year, are on the shelves already—which I suspect means that they’ll reach consumers before they’re showing their full potential’.

Indeed, despite retailers’ best efforts, some were already reporting dwindling stocks by the summer solstice.


‘In California, I think consumers are finally coming around to the versatility and pure enjoyment of dry rosé’ – Duncan Arnot Meyers, of Arnot-Roberts


What does all this mean for California rosé? It certainly spells success.

‘In California, I think consumers are finally coming around to the versatility and pure enjoyment of dry rosé’, says Duncan Arnot Meyers, winemaker and co-proprietor of Arnot-Roberts, a boutique winery in Healdsburg which has been making waves in the rosé world in recent years. ‘In short,’ he concludes, ‘California rosé is doing better than ever’.

As I reported last year, it’s also an especially dynamic genre in the Golden State. Whereas consumers have certain expectations of a California Cabernet, rosé offers more freedom to experiment with out-of-the-way appellations, eclectic grape varieties and different winemaking techniques: the necessity is not so much to ‘impress’ as to refresh. That makes rosé appealing to up-and-coming young winemakers and well-established stalwarts alike.

Continue reading below the wines


William Kelley’s favourite US rosé wines

Click on the wines for the full tasting note and for stockist details, including US stockists.

Kutch, Sonoma Coast, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

Kutch, Sonoma Coast, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

While many of California's best rosés are inspired by Provence, Kutch's superb Pinot Noir cuvée has a cooler climate feel, bearing more than a nodding resemblance to François Cotat's superb Sancerre rosé. An extravagant bouquet of white cherry, tangerine, strawberry, mint and white flowers leads into a taut, vibrant palate,…

Points 93
Tercero, Santa Barbara County, Mourvèdre Rosé, 2016

Tercero, Santa Barbara County, Mourvèdre Rosé, 2016

Larry Schaffer's Mourvèdre rosé couldn't be more impressive: in fact, to my palate it's more exciting than most rosés coming out of Bandol these days, and I was quite smitten when I tasted it. Aromas of crushed strawberry, watermelon, wet stones and spicy bass notes which are hard to pin…

Points 93
Belharra, Carneros, Rosé of Syrah, California, USA, 2016

Belharra, Carneros, Rosé of Syrah, California, USA, 2016

A classy pure Syrah cuvée from the Las Madres vineyard in Carneros, this wine evokes Bandol's best. Classic notes of strawberry and watermelon inflected by citrus zest and hints of dried flowers are followed by a glossy, textural palate with lovely stony minerality and a line of fresh acidity. Probably…

Points 92
County Line Vineyards, Anderson Valley, Rosé, 2016

County Line Vineyards, Anderson Valley, Rosé, 2016

When Eric Sussman, already celebrated for his Radio-Coteau label, noticed that Anderson Valley Pinot Noir from Champagne clones, intended for sparkling wine, was going begging, he correctly surmised that it would make a superb rosé. A sophisticated bouquet of cherry skin, tangerine and a touch of chamomile introduce a zesty,…

Points 92
Bedrock, Sonoma County, Ode to Lulu, California, USA, 2016

Bedrock, Sonoma County, Ode to Lulu, California, USA, 2016

Notes of watermelon, griotte cherry, blood orange and hints of menthol lead into a textural but vibrant palate with great purity, good depth and a clean, precise finish. An homage to Lulu Peyraud of Domaine Tempier, the 2016 is one of the classiest renditions yet of this consistently excellent old…

Points 92
Enfield, Chalone, Antle Rosé, California, USA, 2015

Enfield, Chalone, Antle Rosé, California, USA, 2015

John Lockwood's Pinot Noir rosé is a beautiful expression of the Antle Vineyard in the out of the way Chalone AVA (where he also produces a compelling red). Aromas of spice, orange rind, cherry and strawberry lead into a medium-full palate with some nice textural gloss despite its modest alcohol,…

Points 91
POP 300, Napa Valley, Oakville, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

POP 300, Napa Valley, Oakville, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

The most unusual and the hardest to find of the wines listed here, POP 300 is made by Luke Russ, whose day job is commercial director at O’Shaughnessy Estate on Howell Mountain. Made from Pinot Noir growing in the heart of the famed To Kalon vineyard (ground zero for Napa…

Points 91
Arnot-Roberts, Lake County, Clear Lake Rosé, 2016

Arnot-Roberts, Lake County, Clear Lake Rosé, 2016

From a high altitude site overlooking Clear Lake, Arnot-Roberts' rosé already has an almost cultish following. A delicate bouquet of melon, tangerine and a touch of spice introduce a refreshing, medium-bodied palate long on grace and energy.

Points 90
Frog's Leap, La Grenouille Rougante Pink, California, 2016

Frog's Leap, La Grenouille Rougante Pink, California, 2016

Aromas of apple skin, strawberry and white flowers introduce a medium-full rosé with vibrant acids and crisp fruit flavours. The wine's textural dimensions make it food-friendly, and the finish is clean and lingering. From old vines, predominantly Carignan planted in 1942.

Points 90
Cenyth, Sonoma County, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

Cenyth, Sonoma County, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

Hélène Seillan, the daughter of Vérité’s Bordeaux-trained winemaker Pierre Seillan, works alongside her father; but she also has a new label of her own: Cenyth. This crisp and refreshing rosé, made from Cabernet Franc, nods to Bourgueil with its notes of rosehip, white cherries, chalky soil and white pepper. On…

Points 90
Picayune Cellars, Mendocino County, Rosé, California, 2016

Picayune Cellars, Mendocino County, Rosé, California, 2016

Picayune is a négociant label from French-born and Calistoga-based Claire Weinkauf, who exploits her formidable contacts in the wine community to seek out exceptional juice at a modest price point. Notes of melon, peach and a hint of lavender are the prelude to an elegantly textural, juicy Provençal-styled rosé imbued…

Points 90
Sidebar, Russian River Valley, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

Sidebar, Russian River Valley, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

A keenly-priced label from veteran California winemaker David Ramey, the Sidebar rosé hails from old Syrah vines in the Russian River Valley. Classic notes of strawberry and watermelon introduce a crisp, energetic and chalky palate which over-delivers for the price. Malolactic fermentation blocked.

Points 89
Heitz Cellar, Napa Valley, Grignolino Rosé, 2016

Heitz Cellar, Napa Valley, Grignolino Rosé, 2016

The unusual Grignolino grape was the first parcel of vines Joe Heitz planted when he established the eponymous winery, so the variety enjoys a special place in the Heitz family’s heart—and Napa Valley history. A seductive nose of sweet red cherry and wild berries is followed by a palate built…

Points 88
Decoy, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

Decoy, Rosé, California, USA, 2016

A blend of Syrah and Pinot Noir, picked specially for rosé and vinified in stainless steel, the Decoy 2016 is realised in a Provençal style. A subtle bouquet of strawberry, watermelon and lemon zest introduces a glossy but bright, medium-full palate with good cut. It's crisp and refreshing, but with…

Points 87

Bandol influence

The inspirations behind California’s rosé renaissance are various. Many producers look to Provence—and above all to the Bandol rosés of Domaine Tempier. Long championed by influential wine merchant Kermit Lynch and iconic Bay Area restaurants such as Alice Walter’s Chez Panisse and Judy Rodger’s Zuni Café, the Tempier wines have penetrated deeply into the consciousness of northern California winemakers. Morgan Twain Peterson’s Bedrock rosé is even named ‘Ode to Lulu’, in tribute to Lulu Peyraud, centenarian matriarch of the Tempier dynasty.


It’s clear that in just a few brief years rosé winemaking in California has become notably more accomplished


Others, like Jamie Kutch, nod to the more perfumed, tensile rosés of Sancerre and Burgundy, while Hélène Seillan’s crisp Cabernet Franc rosé hints at Chinon or Bourgeuil. Some winemakers, such as Turley Wine Cellars’ Tegan Passalacqua, are reinventing white Zinfandel for the twenty-first century.

And some are simply inspired by the place: Luke Russ, who grew up in Oakville, Napa Valley, discovered an overgrown patch of Pinot Noir in the heart of the famed To Kalon Vineyard. It’s now the source of one of the state’s most singular rosés, produced in minute quantities.

No longer an afterthought

But whatever their inspiration or varietal medium, it’s clear that in just a few brief years rosé winemaking in California has become notably more accomplished. ‘Rosé is actually an incredibly challenging wine to produce’, reflects Jamie Kutch, whose fragrant Pinot Noir rosé is one of the Golden State’s benchmarks: ‘it’s taken us a lot of work to get to where we are now’.

In the past, much California rosé was an afterthought: producers seeking greater concentration in their red wines would bleed off juice before fermentation; and instead of pouring it down the drain, some made rosé—a method known as saignée (though the name takes on different connotations in Champagne).

In balmy California, however, grapes picked for red wine seldom have sufficient acidity or low enough alcohol levels to make great pink wine.

Today, that method seems to be falling out of favour at the best addresses, as more and more winemakers pick grapes specifically for rosé, seeking out vineyard sites that retain high levels of natural acidity.

‘Early in my career I experimented with saignée rosé,’ says Kutch, ‘but I’ve come to think that it’s is a bi-product of wine and not in the same league as making a traditional-style rosé by whole-cluster pressing fruit’.

Anne Fogerty and Camille Gaio, who produce a sophisticatedly textural single vineyard rosé from Syrah, are similarly circumspect: ‘since we make a red from the same vineyard, we use a bit of saignée to complement the fruit we whole-cluster press’, they tell me.

‘It’s less than ten per cent and we ferment it separately—we always do trials before we use it. But it can lend a little bit of structure and depth to the blend’.

Such fastidiousness may seem out of sync with rosé’s modest price tag, but it’s typical of the attention to detail many producers now lavish on this humble drink.

‘We aren’t making it to get rich as you can’t charge very much for such a simple wine’, says Kutch. ‘We’re making it for the love of it and for the love of wine’. That attitude is widely shared; and it’s precisely what makes California’s best rosés so exciting.

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