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PREMIUM

Austrian indigenous grape: Roter Veltliner

Unrelated to the famous Grüner Veltliner, Roter Veltliner is in fact a more ancient variety that used to dominate Wagram.

You would be forgiven for thinking that Grüner Veltliner was somehow related to Roter Veltliner and, for that matter, Frühroter Veltliner. The latter is an Austrian variation on Malvasia, while Roter Veltliner is unrelated to its more famous green counterpart, and genetically it is a more ancient variety.

The skins aren’t actually red, as the name suggests, but can have a reddish tinge, while the juice is free of pigment. In the 19th century, it was said to be the dominant variety in Wagram, but the surface declined.


Scroll down to see tasting notes and scores for five Roter Veltliner wines worth seeking out



See tasting notes and scores for five Roter Veltliner wines worth seeking out


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